Competition: Viveros And SuicideGirls Tee Off
Nov 2012 13

Competition: Viveros And SuicideGirls Tee Off

Posted In Blog,Fashion,Vanity

SuicideGirls Special Promotion.

SuicideGirls have teemed up with celebrated artist Brian M. Viveros to offer you the chance to win one of the rocking designer T-shirts from his brand new men’s and women’s clothing collections.

Viveros is internationally embraced for his dark and evocative oil, airbrush, acrylic and ink paintings of seductive, doe-eyed beauties. His work has been in numerous gallery exhibitions all over North America and Europe, and his celebrity fans include Metallica and David Lynch.

To enter, head over to SuicideGirls’ Facebook page and share this post featuring the above photo of Ackley Suicide wearing her Viveros T. While you’re on Facebook, like the Viveros Brand Clothing page, and be sure to checkout the super hot “SuicideGirls wear Viveros” slideshow at viverosbrand.com/.

You must be aged 18 or over to enter. The competition closes at midnight PST on Thursday, November 15th, so be sure to share Ackley’s picture before then! Two winners will be selected at random. The winners will be announced on Friday, November 16th at noon PST.

Good Luck!
XOX

<B>My Size Cannot Define Me</B>
Sep 2012 14

My Size Cannot Define Me

Posted In Activism,Beauty,Blog,Fashion,Favorites,Politics,Vanity

by M. J. Johnson


[Zoey in Envy]

“Look at that fat, lazy bitch!”
“Eat a sandwich!”
“Why don’t you go to the gym?”
“You’re too skinny to be a good role model.”
“Lard-ass!”
“Skinny Skank!”
“Lose some weight!”
“Put some meat on your bones!”
“No fatties!”
“Look out, wide load coming through!”
“Bean-pole!”
“Why don’t you do something about your weight?”

When someone is trying to prove how open minded they are about people, they will often say something along the lines of “I don’t care if they’re black, white, yellow, red, gay, straight, Muslim, Jewish, Christian, or Buddhist.” This is supposed to prove that all people are equal in their mind.

But what about a person’s body size?

We live in a sizeist society. Long past the time when it was acceptable to judge someone’s worth based on sex, gender, race, culture, religion, body mods, or ethnicity (though such judgments DO still occur), it is common and largely acceptable to judge someone based on their body type. Comedians commonly joke about Chris Christie’s weight, as if that has something to do with his terrible politics. Articles are written about Keira Knightley’s body type in which self-proclaimed beauty experts call her “dangerously thin” and encourage parents to keep their daughters from seeing her movies, lest the young girls think they need to look like her.

I am a fat man. I’m 6’2” tall and weigh somewhere around 335 lbs. I have a ring of fat around my middle, and climbing 6 flights of stairs makes me breath heavy. Based on that physical description, many people would write me off as an individual, not worth their time and effort. Any opinion of mine could be dismissed because it came from my body.

And I can hear the criticisms: “You’re smart, why don’t you exercise? Why don’t you eat right?” Well, it just so happens that I do. Until I moved to a different state, I was going to the gym 4-5 times per week, 1-2 hours at a time, where I did a cross between aerobic and weight training. My blood pressure is well within the normal range for my age, and my resting pulse is below 80.

But I am still fat. I don’t overeat any more often than a normal sized person; I average about 2500 calories per day, which is just enough to keep someone my size going. I rarely use salt, eat lots of fruit and little red meat, drink water almost exclusively (with an exception for a daily coffee, no sugar, no flavors). I avoid sodas like the plague, and cook almost all my own meals.

Maybe I’m atypical. Maybe I’m genetically predisposed to obesity. Maybe nothing I can do will ever result in me being thin. Or, maybe I just haven’t hit that perfect relation of exercise to food that will turn me into an Adonis.

The point is, nobody can tell that by looking at me. Nobody can tell whether I exercise or sit around playing video games all day. (I don’t. Can’t stand the things.) All anyone can see is that I’m a fat man, and far too many people will dismiss me as such.

This is far from a new idea. For over a century, obesity has been used as a symbol of greed, corruption, and downright evil. There is a reason Dashiell Hammett made the principle villain in his book The Maltese Falcon obese, known for the first half only as “The Fat Man.” This was the Great Depression; anyone with more than enough to eat must have been crooked. The film version came out in the 1940s, at a time when the only roles black actors could get were as servants. Funny how one type of prejudice is not acceptable today, but the other is.

“But people have no control over their race like they do their weight.”

That would be a valid argument, if it were anywhere close to reality. But the truth is, the reasons behind obesity, and why one person gets fat while another does not, are myriad. And, while an inactive lifestyle is, if not the main factor, often a large reason, it is not the only one. Medications, medical conditions, genetics, depression, sleeping habits, limited access to healthy foods or safe free exercise areas (parks, walking trails), even the weather can be factors to obesity.

Of course, us fat folks aren’t the only ones being attacked by sizeism; thin people are often stereotyped as bulimic or anorexic. Yes, those are terrible diseases, but they are not the only reason people are thin. Where an obese person can have an underactive thyroid, a thin person’s can be overactive. This can result in a metabolism that burns away huge amounts of food, faster than the person can eat. And before anyone gets their “Oh, I wish I had that problem” hat on, think about it: always being hungry, needing to eat huge amounts to keep from feeling ill or passing out, spending larger and larger amounts of money just on food.

Why does this happen? Why is sizeism an acceptable prejudice? Maybe it has some connection to the “Cult of the Perfect,” the subconscious worship of beauty. Angelina Jolie wrote a book a few years ago, about her work among the poor children of Third World countries. The message of this book is good, but the writing is pretty pedestrian, and it is far from the only book on the topic. But, because of her celebrity, built largely on her looks, the book was a best seller. It is great, or would be if people actually read the book. I fear many people just bought the book because it was by her than for actual social/cause awareness. Sally Struthers has been doing much the same work for decades, but the most common reaction to her is to make a fat joke.

The point of all this is, you simply cannot tell what is going on by looking at the outside. The basis for all prejudice is ignorance, and that applies to sizeism as well. Unless you are that person’s doctor, with a complete medical history in front of you, it is impossible for you to make any judgment about a person based on their body. And even if you do have that information, passing judgments about someone as a person based on their body-type is no different than passing judgment based on race, ethnicity, gender, sex, or any other physical attribute.

This isn’t about attractiveness; everyone has, and is allowed to have, their type. If someone is not your cup of tea, so be it. This is about making assumptions about a person, stereotyping them, based on their physical form.

And that is always wrong.

SuicideGirls Group Therapy – Tore On Hair Stuff
Aug 2012 03

SuicideGirls Group Therapy – Tore On Hair Stuff

Posted In All Things SG,Beauty,Blog,Vanity

by Nicole Powers

A column which highlights Suicide Girls and their fave groups.



[Above: The many shades of Tore]

This week Tore tells us why there’s never a dull moment in SG’s colorful Hair Stuff group.

Members: 2,105 / Comments: 27,415

WHY DO YOU LOVE IT?: I love Hair Stuff for multiple reasons. I learn something new every time I go in. The group is filled with people who love doing hair or just love the aesthetic. I started DIY dying my hair when I was about 12. The first color I ever dyed it was blue. My skills and love for doing hair have grown tremendously along the years. It’s even led to me getting my cosmetology license. In the group I hear reviews of different products. I read about tips and tricks I wouldn’t of thought of. I always love seeing what everyone does to their hair. We have some awesome talented individuals in group.



DISCUSSION TIP: Don’t be afraid to ask questions. We have people of all levels in the group. Some have never done anything more than a ponytail. We also have professionals in the group who are always willing to give opinions and help as best they can. Our fearless leader, Vivid, is also extremely helpful and way rad.



MOST HEATED DISCUSSION THREAD: Our most popular thread is probably our thread about Coloring and Bleaching. It’s an informational thread so it’s stickied at the top. It’s for anyone with questions really. I try to help out in there when I can. Color can be tricky. If you don’t understand the theory behind it you can end up with a mess. 



BEST RANDOM QUOTE: “I get to join the pink club now!” – We have a 27 page thread dedicated to pink hair here.

WHO’S WELCOME TO JOIN?: Everyone who is interested in hair/cosmetology is welcome to join. We’re a public group. 


[Keep Reading...]

SG Radio Pride Show feat. Cassie Jaye, Jesse Brune and Inga Muscio
Jun 2012 23

SG Radio Pride Show feat. Cassie Jaye, Jesse Brune and Inga Muscio

Posted In Activism,All Things SG,Blog,Books,Entertainment,GLBT,Love,Movies,Politics,Relationships,Sex,SG Radio,Society,Vanity

by Blogbot

This Sunday (June 24th at 10 PM PST) on SuicideGirls Radio, in celebration of Pride month we welcome three guests who have enlightened views on what it means to love. Filmmaker Cassie Jaye (Daddy I Do and Right To Love) and inspirational speaker and lifestyle coach Jesse Brune will be joining SG radio host Nicole Powers (SG’s Managing Ed) and co-hosts Darrah de jour (SG’s Red, White & Femme post-feminist sex & sensuality columnist) and Moxie Suicide (SG model and self proclaimed sexpert) live in studio. Acclaimed author Inga Muscio (Rose: Llove in Violent Times and Cunt: A Declaration of Independence) will also be joining us by phone.

Listen to the world’s leading naked radio show live on Sunday nights from 10 PM til Midnight on suicidegirlsradio.indie1031.com/
(Hit the top right “listen Live” button!)

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

[Keep Reading...]

Kris Richter’s Beyond The INK: The Start of My Adventure In Ink
Mar 2012 19

Kris Richter’s Beyond The INK: The Start of My Adventure In Ink

Posted In Blog,Tattoos,Vanity

by Kris Richter

“I’ve learned it, I’ve lived it, and I love it.”
- Kris Richter

My artist, B.J. Nigh, talked me into getting my first tattoo. I liked it, so I went back. I liked it again, so I went back again. The next time I went in, he suggested a new tattoo. “Skull flowers,” he said by way of a greeting as I approached his station where he was currently tattooing. “What?” I asked. “Skull flowers! Let’s do a skull flower,” he said.

I went to my first tattoo convention in Council Bluffs, Iowa, about seven years ago with my boyfriend at the time. We got there in time to walk around once or twice before the tattoo contest started. I wanted to take B.J. home a trophy! And I did. I ended up winning first place in the Best Small Black and Grey category for the safety pins on my arm.

When I walked off stage, I was handed a card with a picture of International Tattoo Art magazine. It said I had a photo shoot, if I wanted it, with Bill DeMichele, and to be at this room at this time. I was sooo excited! I went to the photo shoot and Bill told me how much he loved all the work I had. He asked me about my artist, and I told Bill that B.J. would be tattooing at the APT in Kansas City the following weekend.

I went home and I was on cloud nine! I called B.J. to tell him the news, and then I went back to normal life. The following Friday, however, I got a phone call from B.J. while I was at work. He said Bill found him at the convention and wanted to photograph me again. So, with almost no money, I made the 3-hour drive to Kansas City. This convention was even bigger than the Council Bluffs one. I met a few people, since I stayed the weekend, and I had a blast.

Bill ended up inviting B.J. to tattoo at Lyle Tuttle’s Old School Tattoo Expo a few months later, in November. We were both stoked; this was huge! This was about the time B.J. suggested the Skull flowers.

We outlined the first one, on the ball of my shoulder, a few weeks before the convention. Now, this was the 2nd Annual Old School Expo, which means it was still held in the City Museum in St. Louis. (It’s now held in the hotel.) The City Museum was such a magical place. It’s literally a giant play place for kids and adults alike. (If you’ve never been, I highly suggest going!) To hear the sound of so many tattoo machines, and hear the on-goings of the convention in that atmosphere was incredible.

Our booth was set up in a nice spot, near the door in one of the rooms. The first day, I sat down to get tattooed. I sat for 6 1/2 hours, my longest sit, to complete my first skull flower. I was shocked at the amount of people who continuously gathered around our booth to watch the progress. We finished in time to enter the Best of Day contest, and… WE WON! The rest of the weekend I walked around the convention with the piece everyone was talking about, and it sparked conversations with people who remain good friends of mine to this day.

[Keep Reading...]

SuicideGirls Group Therapy: All Boobs Great And Small
Nov 2011 09

SuicideGirls Group Therapy: All Boobs Great And Small

Posted In All Things SG,Beauty,Blog,Vanity

by Rachelle Suicide

A column which highlights Suicide Girls and their fave groups.


[Rachelle Suicide in In Daydreams]

This week, Rachelle Suicide sizes up SG’s All Boobs Great And Small Group.

Members: 4,988 / Comments: 10,300

  • WHY DO YOU LOVE IT?: Breasts are like snowflakes, each one different, unique, and beautiful in it’s own way. This group has everything: web cam boobs, Suicide Girls’ boobs, great cleavage, tattooed tits, side boob, under boob (my personal favorite view), small, medium and large breasts. Who wouldn’t love it?
  • DISCUSSION TIP: Everyone has their own personal preferences on boob size and shape, be respectful. This is a positive, fun group –– negativity isn’t tolerated.
  • BEST RANDOM QUOTE: I don’t know why but I love seeing a girl scratch an itchy boob, or adjust their bra strap. Call me a perv if you must, I just think it’s cute, sometimes they make really cute faces when doing so. Anyone else in this boat?”
  • MOST HEATED DISCUSSION THREAD: The “Boobs That Made You Join!!!” thread contains some of the hottest Suicide Girls AND their boobs! Very hot.
  • WHO’S WELCOME TO JOIN?: All Boobs Great and Small is for boob enthusiasts who appreciate all shapes and sizes.

[Keep Reading...]

Not Really A Barbie Girl, In A Barbie World
Oct 2011 25

Not Really A Barbie Girl, In A Barbie World

Posted In Art,Beauty,Blog,Geek,Internuts,Piercings & Body Mods,Tattoos,Trends,Vanity

by Bob Suicide

I don’t plan on ever growing up, though I do plan on single-handedly keeping the vinyl toy industry in business for many years to come. You name it, I’ve got it –– or it’s on preorder. However, even my embarrassingly childish addiction has standards. I have Legos, GI Joes, Transformers, Star Trek and Star Wars figures and replicas, plus Munnys and Dunnys of all sizes, but, I’m not –– and never really was –– a “Barbie girl.” I had a few as a kid, but even then I was more excited about my X-Men and Power Ranger figures than any doll.

However, I recently admitted a secret shame: “Typically, when I go to the toy store (which is often) to look for totally justifiable and not at all embarrassing toys, I make a small but shameful detour down the doll aisle.” And, recently, I even bought a few. Not Barbies, but Mattel’s similar line of dolls: Monster High.

Barbie has often been the target of body and self-image criticism. Thanks to her impossible anatomical proportions, moms across the globe decry the doll’s destruction of their child’s self-esteems –– but always after purchasing one or two because their daughters just had to have one. All the while, the overwhelming majority of girls rabidly desire and play with their dolls completely oblivious to the negative stigma their parents place upon them.

What I lack in “Barbie” fandom I make up for in love for Tokidoki designer Simone Legno, who recently released his own Tokidoki branded doll: the first officially tattooed Barbie. (There were two prior dolls that came with stickers mimicking temporary tattoos, but, since we’re getting technical, anything non-permanent doesn’t count.) With his amazing sense of art and style, Simone has done an amazing service to promote the acceptance of the beauty of tattoos within mainstream society. The doll is a perfect blend of the Tokidoki and Barbie brands. He’s mixed them together in a way that doesn’t compromise either. Part of me looks at that doll and says, “Fuck yeah. She looks cool.” Everything about the design is beautiful and “hip.” There’s an amazing attention to detail and the tattoos in particular portray Simone’s love of Japanese art that underlies all of his work.

There are few things in our American culture that are so identifiable as products of the “American Dream.” Coca Cola’s one and Barbie is another. They’ve been around for ages and while they maintain a classic aesthetic, they subtly evolve as the societal outlook changes. As tattoos are becoming more culturally accepted, it’s exciting to finally have a Barbie with tattoos. It’s exciting to think one of the largest toy manufacturers in the country, which boasts the country’s best selling doll –– a doll that has been defining standards of beauty for decades –– has now embraced tattoos. And, by dint of wearing those tattoos, Barbie and her parent company have declared tattoos to be both feminine and beautiful too.

As a kid, I never looked to my Barbie dolls for aspirational images of who or what I could be or how I should look and, honestly, I don’t think most kids do. Toys are toys. Toys don’t shape a kid’s personality. Children pick toys that reflect their own inner character traits. I didn’t look at my Wild C.A.T.s Zealot figure thinking I was going to become a covert warrior-spy. I liked that figure because I was already a strong girl with a penchant for the wilder side. As an adult however, I find the reverse bleeding into my conscious and I see why parents can easily label a doll as a “role-model.” So I’m pleased –– and even slightly inspired –– to see my formerly subversive love of lowbrow art and tattoos proudly emblazoned on one of America’s biggest icons.

But, another part of me can’t seem to get over the fact that, with the overabundance of pink and the perfectly bobbed hair, she’s eerily similar to Paris Hilton, which is not the best foot forward when it comes to portraying tattoos within the mainstream. If Barbie is an aspirational ambassador, the way parents like to portray her, I can understand the concern they might have for a day when “socialite” replaces “princess” as the number one thing little girls want to be when they grow up. But the same can be said of many of the Barbie dolls on the shelf. When each doll comes with matching purse and a mini dog that fits inside, when the “Dream Mansion” has its own massive walk in closet for shoes, it’s unfair to single this one doll out as the harbinger for the tacky, classless persona of a famous for being famous reality TV star. If this doll gets a scarlet “H,” they all do.

My ultimate gripe is with the “minivan mom’s” rallying cry that tattoos set a bad example for young girls. The gist of their complaint can be summed up by a comment from the Ms Twixt website for parents of Tween-age girls:

“Encouraging children that tattoos are cool is wrong, wrong, wrong.”

In reality, this doll isn’t meant to be a walking ad for the tattoo industry; It’s not even meant for children. It’s a $50 doll, and like the original plastic lady who inspired her, Bild Lilli, this Barbie is clearly marketed to the adult collector. While I can happily whip up a scenario whereby the fact that Barbie, as a shining example of the American Dream, has endorsed tattoos means that body art and modification is beautiful (as I just did), the truth of the matter is this is just a piece of lowbrow art which happens to take the form of a doll. While the doll is a highly publicized and identifiable one that’s typically marketed to children, the reality is two business saw the opportunity for a branding partnership and a hot pop-art designer modified an existing product for a high-end and limited run directed and solely marketed at collectors. No child is going to run their sticky fingers across a Tokidoki Barbie box on a WalMart shelf and the creators never intended that scenario to occur.

The doll aside, why is “encouraging” children to get tattoos wrong –– other than the fact those kids are going to be really bummed when they ride their trike up to the local shop to get their very own body mod and get turned away when they don’t have proper ID. There are laws set in place to ensure underage children can’t get tattoos. Doodling on skin with a sharpie never hurt anything but the occasional couch or really nice shirt (somthing I did ALL the time as a kid). Showing a child a picture of a doll or a person with a tattoo on them doesn’t immediately mean your toddler’s going to come home from preschool with a set of sleeves. Many of their real-life role models –– who are seen as wholesome and positive influences –– have them. Justin Bieber has a tattoo (don’t judge me for knowing that, I already feel enough shame!), and the only negative thing he’s ever inspired kids to get is really stupid haircuts (and his albums!).

Maybe the real answer is to let kids be kids, people be people, and dolls be dolls.

***

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