NEW SG Interview With Jimmi Simpson: House of Cards
May 2014 27

NEW SG Interview With Jimmi Simpson: House of Cards

Posted In Activism,All Things SG,Blog,Entertainment,Favorites,Geek,Internuts,Interviews,Politics,TV

by Nicole Powers

One of the most intriguing characters in the new series of House of Cards, is that of hacker Gavin Orsay played by Jimmi Simpson. The political drama, which is written and produced by Beau Willimon and stars Kevin Spacey as the Machiavellian politician Francis Underwood, is highly addictive and a breakout hit on Netflix.

One of the secrets of the show’s success is that it exposes the down and dirty machinations behind the sanitized spin we’re usually presented with in the media. Indeed, much of the House of Cards action is centered around not only the insider intrigues within the White House, but the power play between politicians and the press.

We’re first introduced to Orsay in House of Cards, when a Washington Herald journalist, Lucas Goddwin (played by Sebastian Arcelus), seeks out the help of the online collective Anonymous, after more traditional forms of investigation lead to nothing but dead ends. Wanting to maintain House of Cards’ consummate sense of authenticity, when Willimon delved into the world of the hactivist hive he sought advice from one of its most respected members, Gregg Housh, who is credited as being one of the people who put the iconic Guy Fawkes mask on the group.

When it comes to recreating reality, the devil is in the detail, and one such detail Willimon included in his fictional series as a result of his association with Housh has had positive repercussions in real life. In a scene in which Orsay is negotiating his way out from under the thumb of an FBI agent, he also requests that “all of Barrett Brown’s charges are dropped.” For the uninitiated, Brown is a talented and colorful Vanity Fair and Guardian journalist with a penchant for red wine and bubble baths, who is currently residing in a Texas penitentiary facing charges related to the sharing of a hyperlink. The case is potentially precedent-setting –– and with threats of a 105-year jail term, has had a chilling effect on journalism –– so a pointed mention in such a highly respected and successful show was lauded by Brown’s supporters, online activists, and journalists alike.

SuicideGirls spoke with Simpson by phone on a Saturday in early March. The actor, who has had memorable recurring roles in the TV series 24, Breakout Kings, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and Psych, and prominent supporting roles in the films The Invention of Lying, Date Night, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, and White House Down, among others, also happens to be a member of our community. Our interview was arranged during enforced downtime, while Simpson was awaiting surgery on his collarbone. Though under doctor’s orders to take things easy himself, he spoke to us while he was waiting for a group of his friends to jump out of a plane.

Read our exclusive interview with Jimmi Simpson on SuicideGirls.com/.

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SG Radio feat Coffee and Conversation with Jason Leopold, Sean Bonner, and Tait Fletcher
Mar 2014 26

SG Radio feat Coffee and Conversation with Jason Leopold, Sean Bonner, and Tait Fletcher

Posted In All Things SG,Blog,Entertainment,Food & Drink,Geek,SG Radio

by Blogbot

UPDATE: VIEW LAST WEEK’S EPCILY CAFFEINATED SHOW FEATURING COFFE CHEMISTS, CAVEMAN, AND CONNOISSEURS IN THE PLAYER ABOVE.

This Thursday, March 27th on SuicideGirls Radio, hosts Nicole Powers and Chloe Suicide will be joined by renaissance men and coffee connoisseurs Jason Leopold, Sean Bonner, and Tait Fletcher. Well be talking current events and comparing and contrasting coffees made live on air by Sean Bonner, who curates his own Coffee Posse tasters club, and Tait Fletcher, who has a highly specialized boutique coffee company called Caveman Coffee.

You can listen – and watch – the world’s leading naked radio show live on Thursday nights from 6 til 8 PM at our new state-of-the-art all digital home: TradioV.com.

You’ll also be able to listen to our podcasts via Stitcherdownload the app now!

If you have questions for the SG Radio crew or our guests, you can call in during the live broadcast at: 1-855-TRV-inLA (1-855-878-4652)

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

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SG Gamer Of The Week: Jeckyl Suicide
Nov 2013 13

SG Gamer Of The Week: Jeckyl Suicide

Posted In All Things SG,Blog,Entertainment,Gaming,Geek,Internuts

by Alex Hinkley

This week’s SG Gamer of the Week is Jeckyl. She is a hardcore girl that has a not-so-secret nerdy side to her. Jeckyl loves Star Wars and owning face in Call of Duty. I talked to her about some of her favorite games and what she thinks of Disney taking over the Star Wars franchise.

So tell me about your SG nickname, Jeckyl. The first thing that comes to mind is Doctor Jeckyl…

Yeah that’s exactly where the name comes from. My Suicide Girls persona is sort of like my alter ego, like a Jekyll and Hyde thing. I like to think that Jeckyl is the opposite of me and that, as Jeckyl, I get to act out all the things I’d be too shy to do as myself.

What are some of your favorite games of all-time?

Alice: Madness Returns, Super Mario Brothers, and Star Wars: The Force Unleashed.

What about favorite current games?

Black Ops 2, Assassins Creed 3, and FIFA 13.

So I take it you are a soccer fan? Do you like any other sports?

I am yes. Soccer players are very nice to look at. =P Occasionally I’ll watch rugby or hockey, but I’m really more into roller derby. It’s my favorite sport!

PS3 or Xbox 360?

PS3.

Are you into online gaming or are you more of a campaign type girl?

Online. I like to kick ass.

I’m sure all the Black Ops 2 players reading this will want to know, what’s your k/d?

1.75. I’ve been thinking of getting it tattooed on my arm as a testament to my awesomeness.

Your profile says you live in South Africa. Tell me about what it’s like living there from a gaming perspective. Do video games cost more there? Does the internet suck?

The internet is a real pain here. It went down about three times today already. I don’t think games are more expensive but some games we don’t have yet so we have to order from overseas and shipping can get pretty pricey. Gaming seems to be growing here though, we even have an annual gaming convention called Rage where we get to play and sample all the latest stuff, it’s really rad.

You mentioned Star Wars: The Force Unleashed was one of your all-time faves, does this mean you are a huge Star Wars fan in general?

I am, yes, a closet fan though. Being a nerd kinda contradicts my hardcore alternative image. But Star Wars is a classic, and I’m a sucker for the classics. Also Hayden Christensen is a dish.

Of course you know what I have to ask next. Favorite Star Wars movie?

I really liked The Clone Wars but with some reservations. The Clone Wars animated series was surprisingly good, too. Much better than the movie. Yoda was pretty kick ass.

How do you feel about Disney acquiring Star Wars?

I’m actually kind of excited to see what Disney does with it. I really lost faith in Lucas Films after a few glitches they passed off as movies these last few years. I think it’s a really awesome way to introduce Star Wars to a newer generation that grew up without it. And really nothing beats Star Wars on the big screen so I’m definitely looking forward to next movies!

If you could make your own video game, what would you make?

Probably a cross between Black Ops 2 and Assassin’s Creed 3. It would be really cool to combine the storyline and killing styles in Assassin’s Creed with the machinery from Black Ops. People’s minds would melt from awesome overload.

For more on Jeckyl visit her SuicideGirls‘ profile and follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

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Julia O’Dwyer – Hacking Politics
Nov 2013 11

Julia O’Dwyer – Hacking Politics

Posted In Activism,Blog,Books,Entertainment,Favorites,Geek,Internuts,Interviews,Politics

by Nicole Powers

The following interview was conducted in November 2012 for the book Hacking Politics: How Geeks, Progressives, The Tea Party, Gamers, Anarchists and Suits Teamed up to Defeat SOPA and Save the Internet. Compiled by Demand Progress, Hacking Politics is a firsthand account of how a ragtag band of activists and technologists overcame a $90 million lobbying machine to defeat the most serious threat to Internet freedom in memory. It features contributions from Aaron Swartz, Lawrence Lessig, Cory Doctorow, Ron Paul, Kim Dotcom, and many more, and is available now via Tor Books.

Anyone who’s ever posted a link online without thoroughly investigating its providence should be concerned about the fate of a British student who is facing extradition and a ten year prison sentence in America – despite the fact that the crimes US prosecutors allege he is guilty of were not committed on US soil or servers and are not considered by experts to be against the law in the UK.

Richard O’Dwyer, a 24-year old from Chesterfield, England, founded TVShack.net in December 2007 while studying for a degree in computer science at Sheffield Hallam University. The site, which O’Dwyer started as a hobby, was essentially a boutique, entertainment-orientated search engine, which provided users with links to streaming movies, TV shows, documentaries, anime and music. TVShack.net hosted no content on its servers, it merely pointed users in the direction of third party sites that did.

Without warning, on June 30, 2010, the TVShack.net domain was seized by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] and a boilerplate copyright notice was posted on the site. Since Richard wasn’t operating from within the US, he wasn’t alarmed by this setback. Unperturbed, he switched over to TVShack.cc – a Top Level Domain based in the Cocos Islands (an Australian territory) – and soon had the website back up and running.

Richard continued to run TVShack.cc unimpeded, until one day when he got a rather unexpected knock at the door. The very long arm of the law, in the form of two American ICE officers, had come a calling at his university accommodation in the North of England, accompanied by an escort of Her Majesty’s boys in blue. Richard was arrested, but the investigation in the UK was subsequently dropped.

However, the Southern District Court in New York is attempting to prosecute Richard on one count of conspiracy to commit copyright infringement and one count of criminal infringement of copyright. The application of existing intellectual property law in this way stretches it far beyond the boundaries – and borders – that lawmakers could possibly have originally envisioned. Furthermore, the US Government’s determination to prosecute this test case – at the MPAA’s behest – is chilling when you consider how it may affect the very fabric of the web.

Even though Richard has committed no crimes that the British legal system is remotely interested in prosecuting, on January 13, 2012, a UK magistrate ruled that Richard could be extradited to America to face charges there. The judge was acting under the auspices of the highly contentious Extradition Act of 2003, a lopsided piece of legislation that was drafted in the wake of 9/11 and was sold to the public as an anti-terrorism measure.

Richard, and his mother Julia, a National Health Service nurse, are currently in the process of appealing this autocratic extradition ruling. As the legal process sluggishly moves towards a seemingly inevitable conclusion – since very few extradition requests from the US are declined – Richard is attempting to keep his head focused on his studies and his e-books. I therefore spoke with Julia, who has been spearheading the fight to keep Richard in the UK, about her son’s situation and the implications it could have for all webmasters and denizens of the net.

Nicole Powers: Were you aware at the time that Richard was doing this website?

Julia O’Dwyer: Well I knew he had a website, but he was at university. He wasn’t actually living at home all the time, so I wouldn’t be seeing him working on it that often because he wasn’t here. He would come home every few weeks or at the end of the university term. I knew he’d got a website. I didn’t really know the details of it…He did the website as a hobby. That’s all it was. One of his mates made a suggestion to him and he said, “Alright, I’ll do that.” So he did it.

NP: Had your son ever been in trouble before?

JD: No, no, never.

NP: When did you first realize something was wrong?

JD: I think it was in the summer of 2010. He was actually at home because it was the college holidays. I remember him saying, “Somebody’s taken down my website.” He was here in the room with me and he was like muttering away [saying], “Well, I’ll fix that.” America had put on this big red banner that is still on the website onto his original domain name, so he just fixed it and got it up and running on a new domain name. I can remember him saying, “America has nothing to do with me.” That was the end of it. He had it fixed and up and running again within a day or two.

NP: I’ve seen the banner. It just looks like one of those standard notices that you see and ignore at the start of a DVD. Aside from that, at the time, did anyone from the US government contact him?

JD: Nobody had contacted him at all. He’d said he’d had a couple of take down requests, which were not correctly formatted, so that meant he couldn’t find the links that they were trying to refer to. He had a take down request to remove a link from a British film company, and he complied with that request. But apart from those, there was no correspondence or communication from anybody in America to Richard about his website. All his mail would come to this address. When he’s at university, because he changes accommodation every year on the course, he always gives his home address as his mailing address. I know that nothing came here because I always open the mail in case there’s anything urgent…So I can safely say that no correspondence came to this address, and they did have this address because his domain was registered in his name with his home address. After they took down his first domain name in July we never heard anything from anybody until the police arrived in November wanting to question him about his website…That very same day he closed down the domain name and any of his email addresses that were associated with that website

NP: So before the police knocked on his door, he had no way of really knowing what he’d done wrong.

JD: I think he just thought, well I’m not in America; I’m not subject to the laws of America. That’s how he would think. That’s why he said, “They’re nothing to do with me, so I’ll fix it.” Which he did. Then they didn’t like that so they came after him.

NP: Where was he when the police arrived?

JD: He was in Sheffield at his student accommodation. It was early in the morning. He was just getting ready to go to classes and some police knocked on his door…There was police from the City of London, and two American agents. We assume it was ICE agents. They weren’t present when Richard was being questioned. I don’t know why they were there, but they didn’t come in on any of the questioning.

NP: So they took him down to the police station.

JD: In Sheffield, yes.

NP: I was watching an interview that Richard did with The Guardian in which he talked about how he asked if he should have a solicitor present and they brushed him off by saying it’d take too long.

JD: Yeah…They said to him it’s going to take a few hours to get one here. Because they said that, and because he had no previous dealings with the police, he didn’t ask for a solicitor. And he wanted to get to his classes. He didn’t want to be late.

NP: What’s your understanding of what was said during the questioning?

JD: Well I have the transcript of the police interview…It wasn’t a long interview. It was about 40 minutes…[They said] they were arresting him under copyright, designs and patents offenses. They said the website is streaming films and TV, and that’s infringing copyright legislation, so therefore the money you’re making is effectively money laundering; it’s the proceeds of your criminal activity.That’s why you’re being arrested. They asked him about the website, when he made it. They asked him did anybody else help him with the website. They asked him about how he managed the website, and if he generated an income from it. They asked him how it technically worked. It was just links on the website, there was no copyrighted content…They asked him how people would go on it, select a link, would be directed to Youtube or some other video sites. They asked him about how it gained popularity…They asked him more technical stuff about the website, where the servers were. No servers were in America. He told them it was all his own work, nobody helped him. He did it as a hobby. That’s about it really…He was actually in tears for most of the interview. I didn’t find that out until I got this transcript. I was a bit annoyed about that.

NP: How old was he at this time?

JD: He was questioned in 2010, so he was 22…The police were also here at my house at the same time questioning me. They probably had this address down for Richard as well you see.

NP: So simultaneously to the police knocking on Richard’s door at his digs they’re knocking on your door?

JD: Yes…Same time, early in the morning. I wasn’t going to work that day because we had the joiners here. They were taking out the staircase and putting new stairs in. They came and I was really worried and thought Richard had been in an accident. That’s the first thing I thought when I saw these police. It was about half 6 or 7 in the morning. It was dark. Anyway, they said they wanted to speak to me about a website that Richard had.

NP: Under what circumstances did Richard finally get released?

JD: When they finished questioning me I just sent him a text telling him to come home or he texted me and said he was coming home, and so he did. Nobody mentioned extradition at this point. That wasn’t even something that entered our minds. So I just said, “Don’t worry about it, Richard. We’ll get a solicitor, we’ll sort it all out.” He was told that he was on bail and that he would have to go back to the City of London Police Station, which is where those police came from, six months later, which he did. We both went there.

NP: What happened when you went down to London six months later in May of 2011?

JD: It was just to go to the police station to answer to the bail. Richard by now had got a solicitor who also knew nothing about extradition. He got us somebody to meet Richard at the police station…He went in with Richard, and then quickly came out and said the criminal investigation in the UK had been dropped. I felt an immediate sigh of relief, but then in the next sentence he said, but we’ve got this extradition warrant instead, and we have to go straight to the courts. That happened quickly. Richard was put straight into a police car and taken to the court. I had to go and find my way to the court, and that’s the first we heard about the mention of extradition.

NP: So with no warning, all of a sudden you’re in a UK court fighting extradition.

JD: Yes. Richard was put straight into a cell at the police station. He was locked up. I had to make my way there and the lawyer said that a barrister would meet me there…I had to be there for 2 and I don’t think the barrister came ‘til about 4. Richard was locked up all this time so I couldn’t have any contact with him.

NP: I’m guessing your lawyer would have had to scrabble around to find a barrister because he didn’t even know he was going to need one.

JD: Exactly, yes. While Richard was locked up and I was waiting to go to into this court, loads of people were there waiting for the same purpose, not to go America but to Europe…I went into the court to wait Richard’s turn. They just keep coming in, one after the other…they were all just being processed through…And I was just thinking, oh my God, this is going to happen to Richard next. We didn’t get any information. Nobody gave us a leaflet about what happens if you’re given an extradition warrant. I only knew what I could see going on there. The fact was everybody was getting their extradition requests rubber-stamped.

When Richard came into the court there was a prosecutor there for America and this barrister that we had. Of course, she knew nothing either. Nobody knew about the case because we didn’t know there was a case. The prosecutors wanted Richard to be kept in prison, so they were arguing for that. It was really terrifying because they were so nasty. Because Richard had got exams the following week, and we’d told all this to the barrister woman. She managed to get bail for Richard, but he had to go in prison overnight because they wanted his passport. We didn’t go to London with a passport, it was here at home, and they wanted some cash as well. Then it was 5 o’clock, and the court was closing. We couldn’t physically get the money and get the passport by 5 o’ clock when we didn’t even go into the court until 4, so Richard had to go to Wandsworth Prison. Luckily my sister lives in London so I was able to give her a call. I went to her house and then the next day we got the money and I phoned home and got my partner to get the passport. None of it was straightforward.

NP: I can imagine; Chesterfield’s 150 miles away from London.

JD: You have to take the passport to a local police station, and they have to contact the prison. But the trouble is I was trying to do this at 5 o’ clock after Richard had gone off to Wandsworth Prison. They make them sit in a van for hours outside, they take hours to process them into the prison, and until they’re actually processed into the prison and moved onto their computer system, they wouldn’t accept the passport. My partner…he was in Worksop [a town 16 miles from Chesterfield] at the time, and the police were like, “We don’t know how to do this. We can’t take your passport.” It was just hopeless, the whole thing. But by the next day, we got that sorted, and he was able to come out in the afternoon.

The other thing was they didn’t know what bail conditions to impose on him. The judge was like, “We’ve got the money, we’ve got the passport, what else can we do to him?” The barrister said we could say that he mustn’t access the internet, but then the judge was saying he’s got exams the next week, he’s at university, so we can’t do that, can we? And how could we police that anyway, he could just go in an internet café. So Richard had to tap on the glass, because he was behind this glass wall in the court, to get somebody to come over so that he could make suggestions to them about his bail. He just said, “You could tell me not to access the TV Shack website” – which he’d already taken down anyway – and “You could tell me not to buy any new domain names.” So he chose his own bail restrictions because they didn’t know what to do. It was funny. Well it would have been funny if it hadn’t been so frightening.

NP: So now he’s back studying at university and you’re fighting extradition, which is just a ridiculous thing because he’s not committed any crime that anyone’s interested in prosecuting him for in the UK, and it’s arguable that he’s committed no crime at all.

JD: Yes, that’s right. He never went to America. America is claiming jurisdiction over somebody who has never set foot in their country. They don’t allow it to happen to their own citizens. We can’t do it to them. I have a freedom of information request which shows that not one American has ever been extradited to the UK for something that they’d done in America. And the UK has never asked for an extradition of an American for something that they’ve done in America. So it’s mad.

NP: What’s the process to fight the extradition? And where are you at with it right now?

JD: Well we’ve just received a date for the appeal in December…The main argument is that Richard’s website operated in the same way as the TV Links website…and the TV Links case was thrown out of court. It was dismissed…It was thrown out because they said that linking to any content is not a crime basically.

NP: As I understand it, they were claiming the difference with Richard’s case was that he was curating content?

JD: No, they didn’t say that actually. In fact it was quite a cock up at the court…We had a few hearings where we presented the arguments through October and November of 2011…In order to be extradited the alleged crime must be a crime in both countries. We were trying to prove that it is not a crime in the UK. If we had won that argument, then Richard couldn’t be extradited. At that court hearing the judge was saying yes, you’ve got a good, strong argument. And so was the prosecutor. We had another hearing booked, because there’s other arguments that you put forward like human rights…

The next court appearance, the night before we were going to London we got a late submission from the other side. When you get a document through, you have to read it and you’re meant to rebut it, provide a response. But it came to us at something like 7 o’ clock at night; we were going to get on a train at 5 in the morning. Normally we would look at these documents for a week or so and with the solicitor write a response. I was really cross about this…I just sent a bit of a ranty email saying, “Why are we getting this crap? It’s full of inaccuracies. The prosecution clearly don’t have the technical knowledge to understand what it’s all about.”

The next morning, we got to London, I was still mad about this, because we had to do a very quick response to it. The barrister came and he said, “Oh, I’ve sent your email to the prosecution barrister, and he’s decided not to submit that document.” It was rubbish anyway. We weren’t afraid for him to submit it, just annoyed that it was sent so late. But he’d decided not to [submit it]. Because of that, the barrister said let’s leave it now as we left it last time, which is when the judge said we’ve got a good strong argument. We still had some other material to send in, but he said let’s leave it. I didn’t want to leave it. I wanted to carry on because I wanted it done good and proper, so that they wouldn’t be able to come back. But because he felt that the judge and the prosecutor were agreeing that we had a good argument, he thought we would win it, so we didn’t then submit this extra stuff…But then it all changed. Six weeks later the judge changed his mind. So we have to appeal against that decision, and this is the date that we’re waiting for, the appeal.

NP: I presume this is all costing an incredible amount of time and money…

JD: Well Richard has legal aid, because he’s a student, so we don’t have to pay legal costs. We’ve had to pay for a couple of things, like we had a video made to explain to the judge how linking works. Because you get judges who are not technically literate…There’s been the costs associated with traveling up and down to London quite a lot. That’s expensive.

NP: And I understand that you had to temporarily give up work.

JD: Yes, I was off work for about six months as soon as this started happening.

NP: This is so chilling, because what Richard’s done, putting links on a website, if America is successful in this case, the way it could be extrapolated will mean that virtually anyone that’s ever put a website up could be extradited and/or subject to similar prosecution.

JD: I’ve checked the American Department of Justice website, I’ve checked ICE’s website, I’ve checked the British Home Office website, they all have links on, and what do they say? We are not responsible for any content on any third party links…which is what Richard said on his website. Because when you go to a link on somebody’s website, you leave that website and go to elsewhere – don’t you? You don’t stay on that website. The content that you link to isn’t on your website. It’s like if you have an email that somebody sends you with a link on, if you click on the link, you get sent somewhere else. It’s not lodging on your email is it? So yes, it’s worrying, isn’t it, certainly?

NP: Do you have a sense that what you’re fighting isn’t just for Richard? It’s for thousands of people just like Richard, and also for sanity to reign on the internet.

JD: I’ve had to educate myself more about the internet and about extradition law as well. In the course of that I found out all about SOPA and PIPA and all that. So, yes, it is a very important issue isn’t it? And I think you’re right by saying if this is allowed to happen, then there are implications for many others worldwide, and for the internet. So yeah, it’s very important, but obviously I do have to put Richard first. He’s only a little fish really. I’m sure they’ve got bigger fish to fry than a little lad from Derbyshire.

NP: The US Government has virtually unlimited resources, so to drag a 22-year student through the courts like this, it feels like they’re choosing a test case that they thought would be easy pickings.

JD: Well this happened when they were doing this big clamp down called “Operation in our Sites” in America. I only know this now, afterwards…They seized several domain names on that same day, the 29th of November, 2010. After this had all happened, after the police came here, we received through the post documents about the domain name seizure. It wasn’t just a document about Richard’s website, it was a big document where all these other websites were listed as well. It was like a group thing, and it showed the addresses of the owners of all the websites. Richard’s was the only one that had his name and address at the side of it. All of the others had post office box numbers. So in that group, he was easy because they had his name and address, whereas the others, they didn’t. Because Richard did it as a hobby, he wasn’t thinking he needed to conceal anything….If it was criminal, he wouldn’t put his name and address on it would he?

NP: It’s also chilling that the website was seized first and questions were asked later. It was seized and shut down without any due process. They wouldn’t do that to a terrestrial business.

JD: Well he wasn’t running it as a business. It was a hobby. He did make money out of it, but he didn’t set out to make money from it. The ad companies approached him. He didn’t go looking to make money. When the advertising companies, who by the way were American, approached him, he just thought, “Yeah, that will be all right. It will pay for my servers and stuff.” He didn’t think it was going to grow into this massively popular website – that just happened by the fact of how the Internet works and how things spread. He never set out to make money from it at all. So yes, they did, they seized the domain with no due process.

NP: Basically it would be the equivalent of seizing a shop and all its contents and closing it down without so much as a court hearing, or even a formal mailed warning.

JD: No warning, no take down notice. I mean when these documents came…eventually, we got one saying if you want to show any interest in this domain name you’ll have to come over here. He just signed to say he wasn’t interested in it because we obviously didn’t want to go over there. But yes, no warnings, no takedown, just that banner slapped on his domain…No correspondence, no communication about takedowns or anything.

NP: Again, this is worrying for anyone who run a website anywhere in the world. If you apply the precedent America is attempting to set, other countries could start doing the same with the various other national domains, and any online business that falls in the sights of a government agency can just be taken down without any due process and people’s livelihoods ruined.

JD: Yes, I mean they have been doing that, haven’t they? I know they have. I’ve been watching. There have been lots of domain seizures and I’ve seen people having to go to court to get their domains back.

NP: How let down do you feel by the UK government? Because they don’t seem to be standing by their own citizen – which is unconscionable when you consider Richard hasn’t done any crime that any English court is remotely interested in prosecuting.

JD: Very let down. But I’m not the only one in that position. They’re just following the law that the previous government created. That’s what I’m doing as well, campaigning for that law to be changed…I thought extradition was for fugitives, people who had gone to America, committed a crime, and then ran away. That’s what a fugitive is. Not to go and get somebody who’s never set foot in America, which is what they’re doing. America can do that because the British side of the extradition law allows them to. They protect their own citizens in America; the UK does not. If an American was to be requested to be extradited to this country, they would have the right to a proper hearing and bit of a trial beforehand…The government, they’ve done nothing…There’s a few good MP’s who are fighting for reform, and they have been very good. But, historically, nobody wins this fight because the British government and the judiciary have got an obligation to stand by their extradition arrangements with America.

NP: Which are one-sided.

JD: Which are lopsided, yes.

NP: How can people help Richard?

JD: Well we’ve really had loads of support. Richard keeps out of the way mostly. I just wanted him to make sure that he continued his university courses and that that wasn’t going to be disrupted. He is doing that; he’s on his final year now.

There’s a few other people in the same position, and people that have been extradited and come back. We’re all working together lobbying the MP’s and getting plenty of stories into the media. A friend has launched a fighting fund recently, we’re just trying to get some money together…I have had lots of offers through Twitter from American lawyers who have said don’t worry, there’s loads of people here who would take this case for free. I’m not worried about that, but I am worried about other costs that might appear if we have to go there.

If you get extradited, you are put straight into a Federal prison in America, because they consider that you’re a flight risk – even though they take your passport. You are taken straight to a Federal prison and you have to fight then to get bail. And if you haven’t got an address in America, somewhere to live, then you’re not going to get bail. And if you don’t get bail, they leave you there to stew in until they are ready for a trial. Part of the rationale for doing that…Well firstly, they’re not ready for a trial, and secondly, they leave you in prison until you get so fed up and want to go home that you agree to a plea bargain. That’s how they resolve 97 percent of their cases in America. Also, if they did grant him bail, they’d want a load of money. So it’s going to be costly enough going to America, because if Richard goes to America I’m going to be going there…I’m just trying to anticipate and plan ahead really…If you fail your appeal, they don’t give you long before they take you. You can be gone within two weeks.

NP: I cannot imagine what you’ve been through and how much of a shock this must be.

JD: It was terrifying at the beginning…I’ve got a bit used to it now because I’ve spent the last six months of my life on the internet finding out more, finding out about copyright law in America, about copyright law in the UK, finding out about the extradition law.

NP: It’s just staggering, the fact that lobbying by bodies such as the RIAA and MPAA have turned something that would otherwise be a civil matter into a criminal one.

JD: Yes. They buy what they want, don’t they, from the government, from the law enforcement agencies by lobbying and stuff. It’s legalized bribery, isn’t it? And they have got people working for them that used to work for the Department of Justice and vice-versa. It’s all a bit incestuous that relationship between America’s law enforcement agencies and the MPAA. I’m not saying that people should commit copyright infringement, but that organization, those industries need to move with the times…Richard in one of his Guardian interviews said there’s nothing better than watching a movie at the cinema. He has always been a big cinemagoer. He still is. He was there yesterday. He goes there as often as he can. He loves movies. Yes, he’ll watch movies on his computer, but if he wants to see a movie proper, he’ll go out to cinema like everybody else does.

NP: People may think that this is never going to affect them, that this is some arcane copyright infringement case. But if they can go after Richard. they can go after anyone with a WordPress blog. No one is safe.

JD: That’s right. I mean, what is Richard to them? He’s just a little nobody in England. He’s nothing really. Why pick on him? He’s small fry…It’s not even clear that Richard has broken a law in America. It’s questionable whether he’s broken one in the UK. But you see you just get shipped over there and you have to fight that in a court.

NP: In effect, it’s guilty until proven innocent.

JD: That’s the way he’s being treated. Because extradition is another punishment, which is given to you before you’ve even had a chance to go into a court to defend yourself. Putting you and your family through this whole process, and then taking you to America and putting you in jail when you haven’t even been found guilty of anything…And just for something like this. He’s not a murderer or a rapist or terrorist or anything.

A month after this interview was conducted, in December 2012, Richard O’Dwyer’s ordeal came to an end when a settlement deal was reached. O’Dwyer traveled to the U.S. voluntarily to appear in a New York court and signed a deferred prosecution agreement. Under its terms, he agreed not to break any U.S. laws and was ordered to pay a £20,000 fine. As long as he complies with this agreement, the extradition request will be dropped.

SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque: On Tour Now
Oct 2013 11

SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque: On Tour Now

Posted In All Things SG,Blog,Burlesque,Entertainment,Geek

by Nicole Powers

Earlier this week SuicideGirls previewed their brand new burlesque show at the Dragonfly in Hollywood, CA. Entitled, Blackheart Burlesque, it will visit 46 cities across America. The tour starts tonight in Cleveland, OH. Get your tix here (VIP packages available).


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<b>SuicideGirls Gamer Of The Week: Toxic Suicide</b>
Aug 2013 13

SuicideGirls Gamer Of The Week: Toxic Suicide

Posted In All Things SG,Blog,Entertainment,Gaming,Geek,Internuts

by Alexander Hinkley


[Toxic Suicide in Wicker Wonderland]

This week’s SuicideGirl Gamer of the Week is Toxic. Toxic loves nerds. Probably because she is one. She’s into Transformers and role-playing games, especially Final Fantasy. I spoke to her about some of her favorites and whether or not she would support a FFVII remake.

Toxic seems like an odd nickname for such a pretty girl. What made you choose it?

Honestly, Toxic wasn’t my original choice. I had a different name picked out that was totally girlie but it didn’t roll off the tongue like “Toxic Suicide” does. Toxic suits me though in more ways than one. Get to know me and you will see why!

Judging from the fact you have “Decepticon” tattooed across your ribs, I take it you are a fan of Transformers?

Don’t let my hot girl disguise fool you. I am just lying low until our leader Megatron collects enough energon cubes here on Earth. With the energy we acquire we can finally reconquer Cybertron and take down the autobots.

When did you get that tattoo anyway?

Wade Davidson at Raven Ink Tattoo tattooed “Decepticon” on my ribs the summer of 2011. I debated getting this tattoo for a long time. Originally I did not want a lot of tattoos…Wow has that changed! Being a Transformers fan since childhood, I can’t imagine not having a tribute to Saturday mornings of watching G1. I cannot believe I didn’t get it sooner. My tattoo always gets me attention from my favorite people to converse with NERDS! Fellow nerds like me! GOODNESS DO I LOVE NERDS!

Tell me about your other tattoos.

Where to start? We can start with my first tattoo. I have “Your Name” tattooed in a heart on my right butt check. Originally I wanted something small that could be easily covered. My heart was done by an artist named Steve O in Susanville, CA.

I have two full sleeves. Both of my sleeves are being done by Jason Iffert at Raven Ink Tattoo in Portland, OR. My right arm is a floral sleeve. It features many of my favorite flowers including a tiger lily and a sunflower. I also have a pinup witch of my mother on my right arm. The pin up is a contribution by Wade Davidson. My left arm is a sleeve of Dr. Seuss characters. All the characters from all my favorite books. There are two small pieces on my left wrist not part of the Seuss theme. I have a matching friendship tattoo on my inner left wrist with my BFF Britney. I also have a “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” piece done by artist John MacDonell.

On the back of my neck I have an owl I named “Dexter” by artist Tomma Mueller. I love Dexter– he has the body of a strawberry! Below that is my full back piece being done by Sharkbait Struckman at Mr. Tattoo in Milwaukie, OR. My full back piece is of the tree of knowledge with owls. This piece is my newest and I love how it is turning out so far. He is such an awesome artist!

Favorite transformer?

My favorite transformer is a hard subject because it’s so close between two: #1 is, and always will be, Megatron. Megatron is a ruthless leader who shows no mercy. #2 is Soundwave, not only because he talks in a cool robotic voice, but he has a cassette deck in his chest that popped out more Decepticons (Like Ravage and Laserbeak). Sooooo rad!

What are some of your favorite video games?

I am a sucker for the classics, especially RPGs, they are by far my favorite to play. My favorite game of all time has to be Final Fantasy VII on PS1, though. The storyline, characters, and summons, I can spend all day running around getting into battles to work up my materia and limit breaks. A close second favorite has to be Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past for Super NES. Best Zelda game ever hands down! I used to spend hours playing this game with my dad as a kid. When I finally beat it by myself it was a moment to remember… I mean I had the Triforce in my little Link hands!

Other games I really enjoy playing Final Fantasy VIII (PS1), Donkey Kong Country 1-3 (Super NES), Kingdom Hearts (PS2), Street Fighter II (Super NES), Mortal Kombat (I play it in the arcade), Eternal Champions (Sega), Tomb Raider (PS1), Legend of Legia (PS1), Sonic the Hedgehog (Sega), Tetris (NES), Duckhunt (NES), and of course Super Mario Bros. (NES). I like pretty much every Mario but especially love the original 1-3.

Preferred system?

I really love my Wii because I can download classic games and play them on my console. I have so many amazing games downloaded into it. Thank God because my NES is to the point where you blow hard and they still aren’t playing!

What about least favorite game? Ever played one that just absolutely sucked?

There is one game that I like but I am terrible at it – Altered Beast which I played on Sega Genesis. I was really good at it when I was a little kid but now I can’t even make it past level two. I strive for improvement though. Besides that I am not a big fan of shooting games. I’ve tried them and they aren’t really my thing.

If you could compare yourself to one video game character, who would it be and why?

I am totally Yuffie Kisaragi from FFVII. When my brother and I used to play we always gave her character my name. For one, Yuffie is a babe with a big personality just like me. She is a very sassy, feisty, and headstrong. I like to compare myself to her good traits because I am definitely not a Materia thief. The best part about Yuffie is she is a ninja just like me!

Did you get a Gold Chocobo and all that?

Yes, I obtained the Gold Chocobo. So much racing, breeding, and gil spent. It’s a long and grueling task but is necessary! Trust me you want the “Knights of the round” Summon especially in the “weapons” and final battles. The way you get it is with the Gold Chocobo. I just started a new FFVII game a while ago and am at the Chocobo side quest yet again. Got to have a game night soon so I can tackle it.

Which was harder in your opinion, Ruby or Emerald Weapon?

They are both pretty tough battles but if your equipped well and have the “Knights of the Round” Materia it makes it a lot easier. I would have to say though Ruby is harder than Emerald weapon, though.

Do you think Sony should remake FFVII in high definition for PS3 or leave the game alone?

I am usually one to say don’t mess with the classics but I wouldn’t mind playing a revamped version of FFVII. It would look so pretty on my LED TV. Only condition though is no major changes to the game/storyline and it keeps its integrity.

For more on Toxic find her on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and SuicideGirls.

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<b>SG Radio DefCon Download and Online Security Special feat. Vince In The Bay, Dell Cameron, and Juturna and Moon Suicide</b>
Aug 2013 08

SG Radio DefCon Download and Online Security Special feat. Vince In The Bay, Dell Cameron, and Juturna and Moon Suicide

Posted In All Things SG,Blog,Geek,Internuts,SG Radio

by Blogbot

[Dell Cameron looks on as Vince In The Bay shakes whistleblower Edward Snowden’s hand, and Andrew Blake of RT America thanks him in a more meaningful way]

This Thursday, August 8th on Suicide Girls Radio host Nicole Powers and guests Dell Cameron (VICE contributor) and Vince In The Bay (podcaster extraordinaire) will be decompressing and downloading info from their recent trip to DefCon, and telling you what it’s like to be trapped in a Vegas casino with 10,000 hackers. They’ll also be giving you the skinny on all the shenanigans, which involved getting stuck in a “hacked” elevator with some of the world’s leading trolls, green Mohawks, having a pillow fight with one of the dinosaurs of the internet in downtown dive bar – and two goats! We’ll also have an infosec expert on hand to teach SuicideGirls Juturna and Moon how to lock down their personal information online.

[Dell Cameron gets a Mohawk to benefit the Electronic Frontier Foundation.}

You can listen – and watch – the world’s leading naked radio show live on Thursday nights from 6 til 8 PM at our new state-of-the-art all digital home: TradioV.com/LA.

You’ll also be able to listen to our podcasts via Stitcherdownload the app now!

If you have questions for the SG Radio crew or our guests, you can call in during the live broadcast at: 1-855-TRV-inLA (1-855-878-4652)

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

**UPDATE**

ICYMI: Our DefCon Download and Online Security Special feat. Vince In The Bay, Dell Cameron, Juturna and Moon Suicide, plus The Voice of God with tips on how to play safe online and with social media.



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